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Books

Started: 2005-09-15 22:53:38

Submitted: 2005-09-15 23:07:35

Visibility: World-readable

My reading queue got a bit heavier today. At Hacking Society, Zan Lynx had Writing Portable Code by Brian Hook. He finished reading it while queueing for his caffinated beverage (it looked espresso-based, but I didn't ask). It looked intriguing, so I took a look and eventually borrowed it.

I headed home and found two packages waiting for me in my mailbox. (My neighborhood has shared mail boxes with individual locks; the box serving me and my closest ten neighbors is right in front of my house. Each box is three inches high, fifteen inches wide, and twelve inches deep; packages go in one sharable locked box with a cubic foot of storage. When I get a package, I get the key to the package box in my personal mailbox; after retrieving my package, the key sticks in the lock waiting for my post-person to retrieve it.) One contained The Design and Evolution of C++, by Bjarne Stroustrup; the other contained The Practice of Programming, by Brian W. Kernighan and Rob Pike and Programming Interviews Exposed by John Mongan and Noah Suojanen. I checked out the second two books from my local public library at various points in the recent past and decided they were worthy enough to own. I hadn't read the first book, but it looked interesting. All three of these books were the non-fiction section of my birthday list. I should never underestimate the ability of my mother-in-law to send me non-fiction books on my list.

Assuming I have any spare time for reading when I head back to Greater Boston next week, I should have plenty to read.

I distrust few things more deeply than acts of literary explication.
- William Gibson, foreword to _Dhalgren_