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They Might Be Giants

Started: 2007-10-18 19:50:38

Submitted: 2007-10-18 21:04:38

Visibility: World-readable

For reasons that the universe is still trying to figure out, I attended three concerts in the span of just over a week during the end of September. Several days after Arcade Fire at Red Rocks on 17 September, I attended They Might Be Giants' concert at the Boulder Theater on Thursday, 20 September. I enjoyed their new album, The Else, and their highly-regarded 1990 album Flood. I camped out in front of the sound booth, noticed an iPod in a dock connected to a high-end audio cable, and waited for the show.

Oppenheimer opened, which turned out to be an interesting two-piece band with lots of pre-recorded instrumentation.

When They Might Be Giants took the stage, John Flansburgh observed the wall separating the drinking section from the non-drinking section and said, "At They Might Be Giants, we have a saying: 'Ten foot wall, eleven foot ladder'."

The concert was entertaining, although I recognized roughly half of the songs.

(After work, before the concert, I drove up Flagstaff to the top of Long Canyon, a one-mile trail branching from Green Mountain Lodge. I've climbed Green Mountain, past the trail junction, dozens of times but never ventured up Long Canyon. I hiked down Long Canyon to Green Mountain Lodge, then headed up Green Mountain and descended via the west ridge. My plan was to GPS map the trail but my batteries died; I recently got around to acquiring a new set of rechargeable AA batteries, which means I need to spend a few cycles to make sure my batteries are charged.)

Having rejected DOS, we're paranoid about anything that isn't
"user-friendly," that requires some adjustment on our part and a
commitment to meet the technology halfway. It's as if Henry Ford rigged
a bridle and set of leather reins to his Model T instead of a steering
wheel and clutch, and to this day we were still driving our cars the way
a 19th century groomsman would handle a horse and buggy.
- Jonathon Keats, "'You Send Me' by Patricia T. O'Conner & Stewart
Kellerman", Salon.com